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Andrea Beaman
Cooking > Healthy Cooking
Recorded: Mar 26, 2015 at 01:30 pm EDT
The liver is a hardworking organ! Here are a few of it's BIG jobs: It cleans your blood. It produces bile for digestion of fats. It stores energy in the form of a sugar called glycogen. The liver breaks down the fat-soluble toxins in your blood and sends them on their way to be excreted by the kidneys. BUT, if the liver is overworked, congested or simply not feeling well, you'll feel it too and all of your bodily systems can be negatively affected. Join me LIVE to discover the best foods that can nourish your liver, PLUS we'll cover the best way to cleanse this organ system to improve your health.
Andrea Beaman
Cooking
Recorded: Feb 20, 2015 at 01:30 pm EDT
It is estimated that over 80 million in the US are suffering with some form of heart disease. A good way to support heart health is to reduce or eliminate foods that contribute to stress, poor immunity, and overgrowth of bacteria. Let me show you how to prepare delicious heart healthy options, as well as some herbal circulatory enhancing remedies. Join me in a 60 minute demo on cooking healthy meals and making lifestyle improvements to give yourself a strong loving heart. Mark your calendar for this Lunch and Learn you don't want to miss!
Don't let the winter drag you down with a cold or flu. I have you covered on how to boost your immunity and strength this season. Join me in a one hour cooking demo covering healing recipes you can easily make to feel your best this winter! I'll also carve out time to answer any questions you have on how you can improve your health! Register now to save your spot for this engaging lunch and learn! We'll be preparing nourishing Bone Stock with Medicinal Culinary Herbs (lung, kidney, adrenal and bone support), Immune Modulating Reishi and Chaga Mushroom Elixir with Licorice Root, Miso Soup with Kelp, Daikon and Shitake Mushrooms. We've got the remedy for what's ailing you!
Andrea Beaman
Cooking
Recorded: Nov 18, 2014 at 01:30 pm EDT
The holidays are here! What are you thinking about preparing for the upcoming festivities? I've got the most delicious and nourishing recipes for you! Join me in a 50 minute demonstration on great soups and stews you can prepare for yourself, and your family and friends. We'll set aside a 10-15 minutes after the demo to answer any cooking questions you may have and how to stay healthy during the holidays. Sign up and mark your calendar for November 18th at 12:30PM for this lunch and learn! We'll prepare an Immune Boosting Wild Mushroom Soup, Gluten-Free Turkey Chowder, and a Beautiful Beet Puree.
Sanjivini Lal
Cooking
Recorded: Jul 22, 2014 at 08:00 pm EDT
Starting your day with the right meal means aligning your day for success. This 30 minute class is broken into two parts. A discussion about common misconceptions about breakfast foods, and then we will do a quick interactive cooking demo and make a healthy breakfast together LIVE!
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Delia Quigley
Cooking
Recorded: May 02, 2014 at 08:30 am EDT
Join Delia Quigly in this fun food session! Delia will share one of her favorite recipes with the class and show you how to make it like a pro. This session will be informational and fun, so join Delia today!
Pastry Chef Francois Payard didn't bring liquid nitrogen or any molecular equipment to the Main Stage for his presentation on Day 3 of ICC. He proclaimed, "basic isn't boring. And if you can do it perfectly, why not?" And so, he brought his simplicity to the big show for the pastry faithful who packed the stands on StarChefs final day at the SuperPier. Before he dove into his cooking demonstration, Payard noted, "people think I'm mean, but I'm not mean!" He portrayed his true fun-loving and playful nature with his choice for the demo: the iconic sweet of every modern American's childhood, the beloved Rice Crispy Treat. "It's so simple to make. And really easy to fuck-up," said the thickly accented Frenchman as he used a paint brush to coat sheets of phyllo in clarified butter and cocoa powder. He stacked the sheets together and baked them between silicone mats to create a crisp geometric garnish to embellish the modest treat. For the crispy itself, Payard combined the tried and true puffed rice cereal with PreGel's dark roasted hazelnut paste, milk chocolate, white chocolate, and peanut oil. He then plated the composed dessert-treat with chocolate mousse, caramelized nuts, caramel sauce, and powdered sugar. When Payard finished the plate and held up the dressed-up American staple for all to see, the humble Rice Crispy Treat received wild applause. Preferring to let his food speak for itself, Payard concluded by saying, "You're lucky if you understood half of what I've said!" A wide smile crept across his face as the audience continued to applaud.
S C
Cooking
Recorded: Jan 18, 2014 at 01:06 pm EDT
Johnny Iuzzini of Sugar Fueled Inc. – New York, NY Sam Mason of OddFellows – Brooklyn, NY Mason spends his days in the test kitchen of OddFellows Ice Cream Co. trying to “get as many different things as I can into ice cream—shove in as much flavor as I can.” Mason’s favorite vehicle for folding flavor into ice creams is liquid nitrogen. On the Main Stage, Mason and Iuzzini made whiskey fluid gel noodles with prehydrated agar. They then pumped the gel into liquid nitrogen, broke them into small pieces, and incorporated them into ice cream base. It’s the best way they’ve found to incorporate virtually impossible to freeze alcohol into an ice cream, with the added benefit of creating pockets of intense whisky flavor. As the temperature of the rock-solid gel balances with the ice cream, the pockets remain, but the textures become homogenous. Mason also froze mini marshmallows with liquid nitrogen, so he could torch them and achieve camp fire glory without a gummy, expanding mess. The frozen marshmallows went into a blender with frozen graham crackers and chocolate to make a s’more powder that he used to coat ice cream balls. One of his proudest achievements is his melon-prosciutto ice cream made by incorporating melon sorbet rocks into a prosciutto-infused ice cream base. Infusions are another method of choice for delivering flavor to his ice creams, as with his prosciutto and chorizo caramel ice creams that involve blitzing meat into cream with a Waring Commercial immersion blender. Another favorite is his cornbread ice cream that involves a quick two-hour infusion with Jiffy cornbread. In his demo, Iuzzini made a trompe l’oeil showpiece with sourdough-infused ice cream, piping a bread slice-shaped mold one-third full with ice cream and pulling it with a vacuum to fill the mold. In the shop, Mason has topped the “bread” with PB&J ice cream (liquid nitrogen shards of Welch’s grape jelly and peanut butter base), serving the ultimate, re-imagined ice cream sandwich. “As a chef, you’re always a target. But ice cream makes everyone happy, and you’re off critics’ radars,” said Mason, whose self-deprecation belies the energy, research, and pastry prowess that he puts into each of his ice cream flavors.
Aki Kamozawa and Alex Talbot, the couple surging the culinary industry forward one blog post at a time, turned up the flavor knob to 11 on the ICC Main Stage. The duo presented on a variety of topics, including how to achieve the intensity of dry aging without moisture loss and expensive equipment by holding beef in a layer of funky blue cheese or cured ham skin. They discussed their new favorite beef fat monté (made with beef fat, beef jus, and xanthan gum) that they use to sauce plates and poach proteins. They also showcased the benefits of lightly scoring and flash freezing meat before deep frying as an incredibly effective way of achieving a crusty surface, tender meat (ice crystals help break down cell walls), and rare center—before bringing the meat to temperature in a CVap. Standing on a Camrack for a little bump in height, Kamozawa broke down a boneless Australian rib-eye into the deckle and center cut, which she then split into two separate steaks. “The rib-eye is an interesting cut of meat,” said Talbot. “It has fat, sinew, and gristle. If you slice and grill it, it has tons of waste. But there’s so much potential.” To help reduce waste and tap into said potential, Talbot discussed how they pressure cook a stock of sinew, cracklings, trim, and even silver skin. When pressure cooked, the silver skin breaks down, and they say it has more flavor than bones. “When you use meat and bones in stock, you’re a gelatin factory. When you’re pressure cooking skin and cracklings, you’re chasing delicious,” said Talbot. Talbot rendered the rib-eye’s trimmed fat and infused it with vadouvan curry, pepperoni, and ground onions (because it’s faster than chopping), later adding shrimp shells and Madeira- and bourbon-marinated scallops to make an umami-forward sauce, which he imparted with smoky flavor inside the Beech Stone Hearth Oven from Jade Range. Talbot and Kamozawa finished the demo with beef tartare with kimchi juice (stolen from Bryan Voltaggio’s demo), assembled on top of ham skin instead of a plate—so they wouldn’t miss their chance at achieving maximum flavor.
Dani García graced the ICC Main Stage like a seasoned performer. The modernist chef, who has restaurants in Spain and New York City, brought his lively wit, humility, and talented Chef de Cuisine, Santiago Guerrero, to a packed audience. García started the demo with an interesting rice paper preparation. Painting it with egg white and seasonings, he deep fried the papers for 10 seconds, during which time they puffed and became shatteringly crispy. He then garnished them with dried Chinese pork, dried shrimp, a dusting of shrimp powder and dots of textured Spanish olive oil. Two lucky participants experienced the texture and umami-forward flavors (with García holding the microphone to their mouths as they ate) and described the sheets as elegant, oceanic, and nori-like. Santiago next made a quick emulsion of Spanish olive oil and seasoned tomato water at a 1:1 ratio with an immersion blender. After adding powdered egg whites and gelatin, he poured the mixture into a whipper, charged it, and expelled the mixture directly into liquid nitrogen. García tested the popcorn-esque result on more audience members and used the pieces as a garnish on his tomato-lobster salad. “Our technique is always in service of taste,” said García. “You cannot do this without liquid nitrogen. It’s how you can eat 50 percent olive oil with a nice mouthfeel,” according to the man who first introduced liquid nitrogen to the kitchen. Ending his presentation with some awe, García presented his dessert, Marbella’s Full Moon, a provocative display of White Chocolate Mousse, Mandarin-Yuzu Center, Walnut Brownie Crumble, Chocolate-covered Corn Nuts, and Citrus Yogurt.
“Why edible art?” posed pastry chef and performance artist Janice Wong of Singapore’s 2:amdessertbar. Because for Wong, the world, and not the plate, is the final frontier in plating, composing, and sharing her craft. “Six years ago [when I started 2:amdessertbar], I was making food and art on a plate,” said Wong. “As we evolved, I thought, ‘How can I make the experience better?’” As she demonstrated with her edible art installation on the Chefs Products Fair floor, Wong changed her focus by creating engaging, complex, and highly edible exhibits that evolve as guests pull gummies off a wall and marshmallows from a ceiling. Alongside the success of her edible art, Wong’s interest in flavor and the plated dessert has also intensified, as she pushes herself to “create without reference.” On the Main Stage, Wong prepared a dish of miso-caramel, miso-yuzu ice cream, and mustard crumble. Sweet, salty, funky, and bright, the audience savored the chance to taste—not just see—her philosophy. “I never look at an ingredient as savory or sweet. It’s how you can pair one ingredient with another,” said Wong, who leaned heavily on red miso to push attendees palates. As Wong devises new and daring flavor combinations and even techniques, she believes in sharing them with the greater culinary community. She self-published one book, and her second is on the way. “I share all my recipes and techniques,” she said. “If I pass them along to the next chef, maybe he can make them better.” Was this a challenge for the audience? The culinary community at large? If so, we can count on endless innovation starting in Singapore and spreading the world over.
“You know the best thing about an Arcobaleno [pasta extruder]: you don’t have to buy fucking Barilla,” said Bryan Voltaggio, chef, Rising Star, culinary competitor, and two-time ICC presenter. His anti-Barilla rant got a loud round of applause from the Main Stage audience, but his demonstration illustrated more than the boycott-ready potential of a pasta extruder. Voltaggio’s first pasta featured Chung Jung One’s gochujang red pepper paste and kimchi juice that he incorporated into the pasta dough. Passing the freshly extruded dough around the audience, attendees leaned in for a whiff of deep, fermented aroma. Voltaggio finished the dish with seared scallops and a sauce of mirin, soy, blitzed uni, and lemongrass. Voltaggio also explained that the recipe for extruded pasta is quite different from hand-kneaded dough. “It should have 30 percent hydration,” he said. And though it may appear shaggy, you should be able to form a ball when you pick it up. For his second dish Voltaggio used a die that produced “cute,” pumpkin-shaped pasta. Destined for one of his fall menus, Voltaggio paired the pumpkin pasta with a sauce of whey-marinated pumpkin purée (for tangy lactic acidity), smoked turkey tails, shiitakes, and more gochujang. Voltaggio said he owned hundreds of dies that allow his team to change up their pasta menus on the fly—without tons of investment in time, research, or failed noodles. He also discussed his work with alternative grains, such as an amaranth-quinoa pasta, and essentially cramming a composed dish into a noodle, as with his borscht-inspired beet juice-horseradish pasta. As if the audience needed convincing, Voltaggio and his team passed around bolognese and noodles for a few hundred guests—the prep work made much simpler with his trusty extruder.
 
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